Read More
This research project seeks to map the development of functional connections within the brain of the human fetus. In particular, our aim is to establish the sequence and patterning of fetal functional neural networks. Participants in our study are healthy expecting mothers in addition to those experiencing complications with their pregnancies, such as Intrauterine Growth Restriction and Preterm Premature Rupture of Membranes. We seek to establish a link between fetal brain development and both environmental and biological factors in a babies’ early years that impact their health and growth. Our approach is to use functional (resting-state) and structural (DTI) neuroimaging methods to model healthy and atypical brain development in utero.

Interested in joining our study? Fill out the form below!

Read More
The major motivation for this research project is to map the emergence of the human connectome over the birth transition, and to understand early functional circuits of the developing human brain. The infant is studied during natural sleep using multi-modal, multi-band MRI that includes, resting-state, DTI, and functional MRI tasks (passive processing of emotional non-words, exposure to smells), as well as anatomical scans. The majority of infants in this study also participated in fetal MRI brain studies, and as such we are able to study brain changes longitudinally at this very early and critical time in human development. Further, measures of brain development, and also trajectories of development (where possible) are evaluated for associations with prenatal conditions and exposures, and also with postnatal developmental outcomes.
Read More
Read More
The aim of this research project is twofold: 1) examining the fetal origins of child neurobehvorial health outcomes, and 2) investigating the effect of sleep deprivation on child cognitive and socio-emotional development. Mothers and children that participated in fetal brain fMRI studies are invited into the lab again between 4-5 years of age. For our first aim, we link measures of child neurobehavioral health back to prenatal factors, such as fetal brain connectivity and maternal psychological stress. Our focus is on neurobehavioral health outcomes related to a healthy weight, sleep, executive functioning, emotion regulation, and functional brain development (as measured with electroencephalography [EEG]). Our second aim focuses on sleep duration, efficiency, circadian rhythm, and sleep environment. To measure child sleep children wear wristband (ActiGraphy) and home visits are conducted to examine the sleep environment.
Read More
Read More
This research project focuses on mapping the neural and behavioral development of emotional processing in children and adolescents. In particular, we compare normal to abnormal development of emotional processing systems in youth. Participants in our studies are both healthy, typically developing children, and children impacted by depression, anxiety or trauma. We aim to establish patterns of functional responses in human neural networks that support emotional processing in youth. Our approach is to use clinical, behavioral, endocrine (cortisol, testosterone), and genetic and epigenetic data as well as both functional (resting-state and task-based) and structural (DTI) neuroimaging methods to model healthy and atypical brain development.

Interested in joining our study? Fill out the form below!